mick’s blog

World Music with Bohemian Betyars

March 15, 2018

Named for the Robin Hood-like bandits of the 19th century, the band plays something described as speed punk freak fol with Hungarian folk Romani stylings.

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Daily Roots with Horace Andy & the Sticks

March 15, 2018

Zion Gate

3-15-18

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RHYTHM ROOTS WORKSHOP 3-14-18

March 14, 2018

RHYTHM ROOTS WORKSHOP

Wednesday March 14th 2018 noon-2pm

Partnership Resources Inc Minneapolis

With the “Just Do It” Percussion Team with Joe, Alex, Jolynn, Lavern, Renee, Jamie, Elijah and Alex.

Tearing it up!

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The Cosmos with NGC 1277

March 14, 2018

NGC 1277 is located near the center of the cluster Perseus, consisting of more than 1000 galaxies and located 240 million light years from us. It travels so fast through the cluster at a speed of 3 million kilometers per hour that it can not merge with other galaxies, absorb their stars or draw gas for star formation. In addition, in the center of the cluster, the intergalactic gas is so hot that it can not condense and form stars. The team was looking for the “slow development” galaxy in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and found 50 candidates, among which NGC 1277 was identified as unique because it contains a central black hole that is much more massive than a galaxy of this size can have. This was confirmed by the scenario that the supermassive black hole and dense structure of the galaxy grew simultaneously, but the stellar population ceased to expand due to the lack of an external inflow of material. The team has 10 other candidate galaxies that demonstrate a different degree of “slow development”. NASA’s James Webb space telescope, scheduled to launch for 2019, will allow astronomers to measure the movement of globular clusters in NGC 1277, which for the first time will provide an opportunity to assess how much dark matter is contained in the primary galaxy.

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Quincy Jones Day

March 14, 2018

Quincy Delight Jones Jr. (born March 14, 1933), also known as “Q“, is an American record producer, actor, conductor, arranger, composer, musician, television producer, film producer, instrumentalist, magazine founder, entertainment company executive, and humanitarian. His career spans six decades in the entertainment industry, a record 79 Grammy Award nominations, and 28 Grammys, including a Grammy Legend Awardin 1991.

Raised in Seattle, Washington, Jones developed interest in music at an early age, and attended the Berklee College of Music. He came to prominence in the 1950s as a jazz arranger and conductor, before moving on to work prolifically in pop music and film scores. In 1968, Jones and his songwriting partner, Bob Russell, became the first African Americans to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song, for “The Eyes of Love” from the Universal Pictures film Banning. That same year, Jones was the first African American to be nominated twice in the same year, as he was also nominated for his work on the 1967 film In Cold Blood for an Academy Award for Best Original Score. In 1971, Jones was the first African American to be the musical director and conductor of the Academy Awards ceremony. In 1995, he was the first African American to receive the Academy’s Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award. He is tied with sound designer Willie D. Burton as the second most Oscar-nominated African American; each has seven nominations (Denzel Washington has nine nominations).

Jones was the producer, with Michael Jackson, of Jackson’s albums Off the Wall (1979), Thriller (1982), and Bad (1987), as well as the producer and conductor of the 1985 charity song “We Are the World“, which raised funds for victims of destitution in Ethiopia.

In 2013, Jones was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as the winner, alongside Lou Adler, of the Ahmet Ertegun Award. Jones was also named by Time Magazine as one of the most influential jazz musicians of the 20th century.

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Shirley Scott Day

March 14, 2018

Shirley Scott (March 14, 1934 – March 10, 2002) was an African-American hard bop and soul-jazz organist. Best known for working with her husband, Stanley Turrentine, and with Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, both saxophonists, Scott’s soulful Hammond talent gained her the nickname “Queen of the Organ”.

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Scott was an admirer of Jimmy Smith, Jackie Davis (American soul jazz singer, organist and bandleader), and Bill Doggett (American jazz and rhythm and blues pianist and organist; and played piano and trumpet before moving to the Hammond organ, her main instrument, though on occasion she still played piano. In the 1950s she became known for her work (1956–1959) with the saxophone player Eddie Davis, particularly on the song “In the Kitchen”. She was married to Stanley Turrentine and played with him from 1960 to 1969. Later, she led her own group, mostly a trio. Saxophonist Harold Vick often played with her.

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Robert Pete Williams Day

March 14, 2018

Robert Pete Williams (March 14, 1914 – December 31, 1980) was an American Louisiana blues musician. His music characteristically employed unconventional structures and guitar tunings, and his songs are often about the time he served in prison. His song “I’ve Grown So Ugly” has been covered by Captain Beefheart, on his album Safe as Milk (1967), and by The Black Keys, on Rubber Factory (2004).

Williams was born in Zachary, Louisiana, to a family of sharecroppers. He had no formal schooling, and spent his childhood picking cotton and cutting sugar cane. In 1928, he moved to Baton Rouge, Louisiana and worked in a lumberyard. At the age of 20, Williams fashioned a crude guitar by attaching five copper strings to a cigar box, and soon after bought a cheap, mass-produced one. Williams was taught by Frank and Robert Metty, and was at first chiefly influenced by Peetie Wheatstraw and Blind Lemon Jefferson. He began to play for small events such as Church gatherings, fish fries, suppers, and dances. From the 1930s to the 1950s, Williams played music and continued to work in the lumberyards of Baton Rouge.

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World Music with Yorùbá Bàtá

March 14, 2018

Featuring Làmídì Àyánkúnlé, master bàtá drummer from Èrìn-Òsun, Nigeria.

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Daily Roots with Jackie Edwards & The Aggrovators

March 14, 2018

Invasion (Wa Da Da) (extended mix)

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RHYTHM ROOTS WORKSHOP 3-13-18

March 13, 2018

RHYTHM ROOTS WORKSHOP

Partnership Resources Inc St Louis Park noon-2pm

With Chan, Marco and Erica from Chicka Boom Chicka Boom

Percussion Team preparing for their March 27th performance

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The Cosmos with NGC 1015

March 13, 2018

This stunning image from Hubble shows the majestic galaxy NGC 1015, found nestled within the constellation of Cetus (The Whale) 118 million light-years from Earth. In this image, we see NGC 1015 face-on, with its beautifully symmetrical swirling arms and bright central bulge creating a scene akin to a sparkling Catherine wheel firework.

NGC 1015 has a bright, fairly large centre and smooth, tightly wound spiral arms and a central “bar” of gas and stars. This shape leads NGC 1015 to be classified as a barred spiral galaxy — just like our home, the Milky Way. Bars are found in around two-thirds of all spiral galaxies, and the arms of this galaxy swirl outwards from a pale yellow ring encircling the bar itself. Scientists believe that any hungry black holes lurking at the centre of barred spirals funnel gas and energy from the outer arms into the core via these glowing bars, feeding the black hole, fueling star birth at the centre and building up the galaxy’s central bulge.

In 2009, a Type Ia supernova named SN 2009ig was spotted in NGC 1015 — one of the bright dots to the upper right of the galaxy’s center. These types of supernovae are extremely important: they are all caused by exploding white dwarfs which have companion stars, and always peak at the same brightness — 5 billion times brighter than the Sun. Knowing the true brightness of these events, and comparing this with their apparent brightness, gives astronomers a unique chance to measure distances in the Universe.

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Blue Mitchell Day

March 13, 2018

Richard AllenBlueMitchell (March 13, 1930 – May 21, 1979) was an American Jazz, rhythm and blues, soul, rock and funk trumpeter, and composer, who recorded many albums as leader and sideman for Riverside, Blue Note and Mainstream Records.

Mitchell was born and raised in Miami, Florida. He began playing trumpet in high school, where he acquired his nickname, Blue.

After high school he played in the rhythm and blues ensembles of Paul Williams, Earl Bostic, and Chuck Willis. After returning to Miami he was noticed by Cannonball Adderley, with whom he recorded for Riverside Records in New York in 1958.

He then joined the Horace Silver Quintet, playing with tenor saxophonist Junior Cook, bassist Gene Taylor and drummer Roy Brooks. Mitchell stayed with Silver’s group until the band’s break-up in 1964, after which he formed a group with members from the Silver quintet, substituting the young pianist Chick Corea for Silver and replacing Brooks, who had fallen ill, with drummer Al Foster. This group produced a number of records for Blue Note. It disbanded in 1969, after which Mitchell joined and toured with Ray Charles until 1971.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4Abjy7tHw8

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Roy Haynes Day

March 13, 2018

Roy Owen Haynes (born March 13, 1925 Boston) is an American jazz drummer and group leader. Haynes is among the most recorded drummers in jazz, and in a career lasting more than 70 years has played in a wide range of styles ranging from swing and bebop to jazz fusion and avant-garde jazz. He has a highly expressive, personal style (“Snap Crackle” was a nickname given him in the 1950s) and is known to foster a deep engagement in his bandmates.[citation needed]

He has also led his own groups, some performing under the name Hip Ensemble. His most recent recordings as a leader are Fountain of Youth and Whereas, both of which have been nominated for a Grammy Award. He continues to perform worldwide and was inducted into the Modern Drummer Hall of Fame in 1999. His son Graham Haynes is a cornetist; his son Craig Haynes and grandson Marcus Gilmore are both drummers.

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World Music with Trio Peligroso

March 13, 2018

Trio Peligroso from Cuba

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Daily Roots with Prince Lincoln And The Royal Rasses

March 13, 2018

Humanity

3-13-18

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVF-wsk8eus

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The Cosmos with NGC 3921

March 12, 2018

It is known today that merging galaxies play a large role in the evolution of galaxies and the formation of elliptical galaxies in particular. However there are only a few merging systems close enough to be observed in depth. The pair of interacting galaxies seen here — known as NGC 3921 — is one of these systems.

NGC 3921 — found in the constellation Ursa Major the Great Bear — is an interacting pair of disk galaxies in the late stages of its merger. Observations show that both of the galaxies involved were about the same mass and collided about 700 million years ago. You can see clearly in this image the disturbed morphology, tails and loops characteristic of a post-merger.

The clash of galaxies caused a rush of star formation, and previous Hubble observations showed over 1,000 bright, young star clusters bursting to life at the heart of the galaxy pair.

Distance‎: ‎26.2 Mly (8.03 Mpc)

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James Taylor Day

March 12, 2018

James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948 Boston) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. A five-time Grammy Award winner, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. He is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold more than 100 million records worldwide.

Taylor achieved his breakthrough in 1970 with the No. 3 single “Fire and Rain” and had his first No. 1 hit the following year with “You’ve Got a Friend“, a recording of Carole King‘s classic song. His 1976 Greatest Hits album was certified Diamond and has sold 12 million US copies. Following his 1977 album, JT, he has retained a large audience over the decades. Every album that he released from 1977 to 2007 sold over 1 million copies. He enjoyed a resurgence in chart performance during the late 1990s and 2000s, when he recorded some of his most-awarded work (including Hourglass, October Road, and Covers). He achieved his first number-one album in the US in 2015 with his recording Before This World.

He is known for his popular covers of other people’s songs, such as “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved by You)” and the aforementioned “You’ve Got A Friend“, as well as originals such as “Fire and Rain“.

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Al Jarreau Day

March 12, 2018

Alwin Lopez “Al” Jarreau (March 12, 1940 – February 12, 2017) was an American singer and musician. He received a total of seven Grammy Awards and was nominated for over a dozen more. Jarreau is perhaps best known for his 1981 album Breakin’ Away. He also sang the theme song of the late-1980s television series Moonlighting, and was among the performers on the 1985 charity song “We Are the World.”

1986: Jarreau in concert in West Berlin.

Jarreau was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on March 12, 1940, the fifth of six children. The Jarreau website refers to Reservoir Avenue, the name of the street where he lived. Jarreau’s father was a Seventh-day Adventist Church minister and singer, and his mother was a church pianist. Jarreau and his family sang together in church concerts and in benefits, and he and his mother performed at PTA meetings.

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Don Drummond Day

March 12, 2018

Don Drummond (12 March 1932– 6 May 1969) was a Jamaican ska trombonist and composer. He was one of the original members of The Skatalites, and composed many of their tunes.

Drummond was born at the Jubilee Hospital in Kingston, Jamaica, to Doris Monroe and Uriah Drummond. He was educated at Kingston’s Alpha Boys School, where he later taught his younger schoolmate Rico Rodriguez to play the trombone.

His musical career began in 1950 with the Eric Dean’s All-Stars where he performed jazz. He continued into the 1960s with others, including Kenny Williams.

After performing jazz for a decade, Drummond began performing ska and in 1964 Don joined The Skatalites. With Drummond’s politicized conversion to the Rastafari movement, other band members followed his lead. He became a household name in Jamaica, before suffering mental problems. He was rated by pianist George Shearing to be among the world’s top five trombone players.

In 1965 Drummond was convicted of the murder of his longtime girlfriend, Anita “Marguerita” Mahfood, an exotic rhumba dancer and singer, on 1 January 1965. He was ruled criminally insane and imprisoned at Bellevue Asylum, Kingston, where he remained until his death four years later. The official cause of death was “natural causes”, possibly heart failure caused by malnutrition or improper medication, but other theories were put forward; some of his colleagues believed it was a government plot against the Kingston musical scene, and some believed that he was killed by gangsters as revenge for the murder of Mahfood. Heather Augustyn, author of a biography of Drummond published in 2013 claimed to have proved that Drummond’s death was caused by his medications.

In 2013, a ballet telling the story of Drummond’s life was performed by the National Dance Theatre Company. Created by Clive Thompson, the ballet is titled Malungu, which was Mahfood’s pet name for Drummond.

In 2013 a comprehensive biography of Don Drummond was published by McFarland Publishing. Don Drummond: The Genius and Tragedy of the World’s Greatest Trombonist by Heather Augustyn features a foreword by Delfeayo Marsalis.

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World Music with Binhan

March 12, 2018

World Music from Guinea Bissau

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Interviews