Daily Roots with Bob Marley

February 10, 2018

Daily Roots with Bob Marley

2-10-18

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MAROONS 2-10-18

February 9, 2018

MAROONS performing Saturday 2-10-18 3pm

St Paul Winter Carnival final day in Rice Park

Pic from original big band in 1989

 

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The Cosmos with NGC 5033

February 9, 2018

NGC 5033 is an inclined spiral galaxy located in the constellation Canes Venatici. Distance estimates vary from between 38 and 60 million light years from the Milky Way Galaxy. The galaxy has a very bright nucleus and a relatively faint disk. Significant warping is visible in the southern half of the disk. The galaxy’s relatively large angular size and relatively high surface brightness make it an object that can be viewed and imaged by amateur astronomers. The galaxy’s location relatively near Earth and its active galactic nucleus make it a commonly studied object for professional astronomers.

NGC 5033 in an amateur telescope

NGC 5033, 32 inch Schulman Foundation telescope on Mt. Lemmon, AZ.

NGC 5033 contains a Seyfert nucleus, a type of active galactic nucleus.Like many other active galactic nuclei, this galaxy’s nucleus is thought to contain a supermassive black hole. The bright emission seen in visible light (as well as other wavebands) is partially produced by the hot gas in the environment around this black hole.

Integral field spectroscopic observations of the center of NGC 5033 indicate that the Seyfert nucleus is not located at the kinematic center of the galaxy (the point around which the stars in the galaxies rotate). This has been interpreted as evidence that this galaxy has undergone a merger. The displacement of the Seyfert nucleus from the kinematic center may destabilize the rotation of gas in the center of the galaxy, which could cause gas to fall into the Seyfert nucleus. The gas would be compressed by the enormous gravitational forces in the center of the Seyfert nucleus and become hot, thus making the nucleus appear bright or “active”.

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Carole King Day

February 9, 2018

Carole King (born Carol Joan Klein, February 9, 1942 Manhattan, NY) is an American composer and singer-songwriter. She is the most successful female songwriter of the latter half of the 20th century in the USA, having written or co-written 118 pop hits on the Billboard Hot 100 between 1955 and 1999. King also wrote 61 hits that charted in the UK, making her the most successful female songwriter on the UK singles charts between 1952 and 2005.

King’s career began in the 1960s when she and her first husband, Gerry Goffin, wrote more than two dozen chart hits for numerous artists, many of which have become standards. She has continued writing for other artists since then. King’s success as a performer in her own right did not come until the 1970s, when she sang her own songs, accompanying herself on the piano, in a series of albums and concerts. After experiencing commercial disappointment with her debut album Writer, King scored her breakthrough with the album Tapestry, which topped the U.S. album chart for 15 weeks in 1971 and remained on the charts for more than six years.

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Javier Perez Forte Day

February 9, 2018

Born February 9, 1960

Made at the Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina) Under the guidance of M ° Rodolfo Candi obtained the diploma of Profesor Superior de Guitarra in 1982. He graduated – Licenciatura en Composición – in 1986. During his studies he took courses in specialization in different disciplines (with teachers: Isabel Siewers and Eduardo Egüez, Oscar Ohlsen, Oscar Ghiglia, Carmelo Saita, Francisco Kröpfl), as well as regular courses and composition seminars with Ivo Malec (Paris 1986), Mariano Etkin (Rosario 1988) , Niccolò Castiglioni (Milan 1989) Pierre Boulez (Milan 1991) and Ennio Morricone (Siena 1991).

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Peanuts Holland Day

February 9, 2018

Herbert Lee “Peanuts” Holland (February 9, 1910 – February 7, 1979) was an American jazz trumpeter best known for his contributions in swing jazz. He was born in Norfolk, Virginia and died in Stockholm, Sweden.

Holland learned to play trumpet at the Jenkins Orphanage. He played and recorded with Alphonse Trent‘s band between 1928 and 1933, and played with Al Sears (1932), the Jeter-Pillars Orchestra, Willie Bryant, Jimmie Lunceford, and Lil Armstrong‘s band (1935–36). He also occasionally led his own band.

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Walter Page Day

February 9, 2018

Walter Sylvester Page (February 9, 1900 – December 20, 1957) was an American jazz multi-instrumentalist and bandleader, best known for his groundbreaking work as a double bass player with Walter Page’s Blue Devils and the Count Basie Orchestra.

Page was born in Gallatin, Missouri on February 9, 1900 to parents Edward and Blanche Page.

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World Music with José Antonio Rodríguez

February 9, 2018

World Music on Flamenco Fridays with  José Antonio Rodríguez

Performing Farruca.

Farruca (Spanish pronunciation: [faˈruka]) is a form of flamenco music. It is a light form typical of cante chico, and is traditionally danced only by men. It is said to have been invented in the 19th century by guitarist Ramón Montoya and flamenco dancer Faíco; others who stylized and expanded farruca included Antonio de Bilbao. Ramirez, Manolito la Rosa, El Batato and Rafaela Valverde, and La Tanguera. Other sources indicate that Farruca originated in Galicia, a region in northern Spain.

Although there are female flamenco dancers who exclusively danced farruca too (such as Rafaela Valverde also known as La Tanguera), these female dancers originally danced the farruca wearing male clothing. Women dancers such as Carmen Amaya and Sara Baras have also created well-known versions of the dance.

Farruca is seldom sung.

The farruca is commonly played in the key of A minor.

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Daily Roots with Jennifer Lara

February 9, 2018

Daily Roots with Jennifer Lara

2-9-18

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The Cosmos with NGC 6118

February 8, 2018

NGC 6118 is a grand design spiral galaxy located 83 million light-years away in the constellation Serpens (the Snake). It measures roughly 110,000 light-years across; about the same as our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Its shape is classified as “SA(s)cd,” meaning that it is unbarred and has several rather loosely wound spiral arms. The large numbers of bright bluish knots are active star-forming regions where some very luminous and young stars can be perceived.

Because NGC 6118 has loosely wound spiral open arms, no clear defined spiral arms like the Milky Way galaxy and lacks a central bar, the galaxy thus does not have a galactic habitable zone like the Milky Way. For the Milky Way, the galactic habitable zone is commonly believed to be an annulus with an outer radius of about 10 kiloparsecs and an inner radius close to the Galactic Center, both of which lack hard boundaries.

NGC 6118 is difficult to see with a small telescope. Amateur astronomers have nicknamed it the “Blinking Galaxy”, as it has a tendency to flick in and out of view with different eye positions.

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Floyd Dixon Day

February 8, 2018

Floyd Dixon (February 8, 1929 – July 26, 2006) was an American rhythm-and-blues pianist and singer.

Dixon was born in Marshall, Texas. Some sources give his birth name as Jay Riggins, Jr., although he himself stated that Floyd Dixon was his real name and that his parents were Velma and Ford Dixon.Growing up, he was influenced by blues, gospel, jazz and country music. His family moved to Los Angeles, California, in 1942. There Dixon met Charles Brown, who had an influence on his music.

The self-dubbed “Mr. Magnificent”, Dixon signed a recording contract with Modern Records in 1949, specializing in jump blues and sexualized songs like “Red Cherries”, “Wine Wine Wine”, “Too Much Jelly Roll” and “Baby Let’s Go Down to the Woods”. Both “Dallas Blues” and “Mississippi Blues”, credited to the Floyd Dixon Trio, reached the Billboard R&B chart in 1949, as did “Sad Journey Blues”, issued byPeacock Records in 1950.

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Eddie Locke Day

February 8, 2018

Eddie Locke (August 2, 1930 – September 7, 2009) was an American jazz drummer.

Eddie Locke was a part of the fertile and vibrant Detroit jazz scene during the 1940s and 1950s, which brought forth many great musicians including the Jones brothers (Hank, Thad, and Elvin), Kenny Burrell, Lucky Thompson, Tommy Flanagan, Barry Harris, and so many others. He eventually formed a variety act with drummer Oliver Jackson called Bop & Locke which played the Apollo Theater. He moved to New York City in 1954, and worked there with Dick Wellstood, Tony Parenti, Red Allen, Willie “The Lion” Smith, and Teddy Wilson amongst others. During this time he came under the tutelage of the great Jo Jones, and eventually became known as a driving and swinging drummer who kept solid time and supported the soloist. During the late 1950s he formed two of his most fruitful musical relationships, one with Roy Eldridge, and the other with Coleman Hawkins. His recording debut came with Eldridge in 1959 on “On The Town”. He later became a member of the Coleman Hawkins Quartet in the 1960s along with pianist Tommy Flanagan and bassist Major Holley. That group made many fine records including the exquisite album “Today and Now”, in 1963. Throughout the 1970s, he played with Roy Eldridge at Jimmy Ryan’s in Manhattan, and wound out his career freelancing, as well as teaching youngsters at the Trevor Day School on Manhattan’s upper west side.

Eddie died on Monday morning, September 7, 2009, in Ramsey, New Jersey.

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Lonnie Johnson Day

February 8, 2018

Lonnie Johnson Day

Alonzo “Lonnie” Johnson (February 8, 1899 – June 16, 1970) was an American blues and jazz singer, guitarist, violinist and songwriter. He was a pioneer ofjazz guitar and jazz violin and is recognized as the first to play an electrically amplified violin.

Johnson was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, and raised in a family of musicians. He studied violin, piano and guitar as a child and learned to play various other instruments, including the mandolin, but he concentrated on the guitar throughout his professional career. “There was music all around us,” he recalled, “and in my family you’d better play something, even if you just banged on a tin can.”

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World Music with Innov Gnawa

February 8, 2018

World Music with Inner Gnawa from Morocco

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Daily Roots with Bob Marley

February 8, 2018

Daily Roots with Bob Marley

2-8-18

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxFmMtUYLqw

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RHYTHM ROOTS WORKSHOP 2-7-18

February 7, 2018

RHYTHM ROOTS WORKSHOP

Wednesday February 7th noon-2pm

Partnership Resources Inc Minneapolis

Developmentally Disabled participants swinging grooves for Mardi Gras week.

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The Cosmos with NGC 7331

February 7, 2018

Big, beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 7331 is often touted as an analog to our own Milky Way. About 50 million light-years distant in the northern constellation Pegasus, NGC 7331 was recognized early on as a spiral nebula and is actually one of the brighter galaxies not included in Charles Messier’s famous 18th century catalog. Since the galaxy’s disk is inclined to our line-of-sight, long telescopic exposures often result in an image that evokes a strong sense of depth. In this Hubble Space Telescope close-up, the galaxy’s magnificent spiral arms feature dark obscuring dust lanes, bright bluish clusters of massive young stars, and the telltale reddish glow of active star forming regions. The bright yellowish central regions harbor populations of older, cooler stars. Like the Milky Way, a supermassive black hole lies at the core of of spiral galaxy NGC 7331.

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a spiral galaxy known as NGC 7331. First spotted by the prolific galaxy hunter William Herschel in 1784, NGC 7331 is located about 45 million light-years away in the constellation of Pegasus (The Winged Horse). Facing us partially edge-on, the galaxy showcases it’s beautiful arms which swirl like a whirlpool around its bright central region. Astronomers took this image using Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), as they were observing an extraordinary exploding star — a supernova — which can still be faintly seen as a tiny red dot near the galaxy’s central yellow core. Named SN2014C, it rapidly evolved from a supernova containing very little Hydrogen to one that is Hydrogen-rich — in just one year. This rarely observed metamorphosis was luminous at high energies and provides unique insight into the poorly understood final phases of massive stars. NGC 7331 is similar in size, shape, and mass to the Milky Way. It also has a comparable star formation rate, hosts a similar number of stars, has a central supermassive black hole and comparable spiral arms. The primary difference between our galaxies is that NGC 7331 is an unbarred spiral galaxy — it lacks a “bar” of stars, gas and dust cutting through its nucleus, as we see in the Milky Way. Its central bulge also displays a quirky and unusual rotation pattern, spinning in the opposite direction to the galactic disc itself. By studying similar galaxies we hold a scientific mirror up to our own, allowing us to build a better understanding of our galactic environment which we cannot always observe, and of galactic behaviour and evolution as a whole.

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Earl King Day

February 7, 2018

Earl Silas Johnson IV (February 7, 1934 – April 17, 2003), known as Earl King, was an American singer, guitarist, and songwriter, most active in blues music. A composer of blues standards such as “Come On” (covered by Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan) and “Big Chief” (recorded by Professor Longhair), he was an important figure in New Orleans R&B.

King was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States. His father was a piano player. He died when Earl was still a baby, and Earl was brought up by his mother. With his mother, he started going to church at an early age. In his youth he sang gospel music, but he took the advice of a friend to switch to blues to make a better living.

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King Curtis Day

February 7, 2018

Curtis Ousley (February 7, 1934 – August 13, 1971), who performed under the stage name King Curtis, was an American saxophonist known for rhythm and blues, rock and roll, soul, blues, funk and soul jazz. Variously a bandleader, band member, and session musician, he was also a musical director and record producer. Adept at tenor, alto, and soprano saxophone, he was best known for his distinctive riffs and solos such as on “Yakety Yak“, which later became the inspiration for Boots Randolph‘s “Yakety Sax” and his own “Memphis Soul Stew”.

The son of Ethel Montgomery, he was born Curtis Montgomery in Fort Worth, Texas, and was adopted, with his sister Josephine Allen, by Josie and William Ousley. Curtis Ousley attended I.M. Terrell High School, and studied and performed music with schoolmate Ornette Coleman.

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Eubie Blake Day

February 7, 2018

James Hubert Blake (February 7, 1887– February 12, 1983), known as Eubie Blake, was an American composer, lyricist, and pianist of ragtime, jazz, and popular music. In 1921, he and his long-time collaborator Noble Sissle wrote Shuffle Along, one of the first Broadway musicals to be written and directed by African Americans. Blake’s compositions included such hits as “Bandana Days”, “Charleston Rag”, “Love Will Find a Way”, “Memories of You” and “I’m Just Wild About Harry“. The musical Eubie!, which opened on Broadway in 1978, featured his works.

Blake was born at 319 Forrest Street in Baltimore, Maryland, to John Sumner Blake (1838–1917) and Emily “Emma” Johnstone (1861–1927), both of whom had been slaves. He was the only surviving child of eight, all the rest of whom died in infancy. In 1894, the family moved to 414 North Eden Street, and later to 1510 Jefferson Street. John Blake earned US$9.00 weekly working as a stevedore on the Baltimore docks.

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Interviews